About the Global Frackdown

The Global Frackdown is an international day of action initiated by Food & Water Watch to ban fracking —a risky technique that uses millions of gallons of water, sand and chemicals to break open rock formations deep underground to release oil and gas. The oil and gas industry has spent millions of dollars on slick public relations campaigns and high-profile lobbying efforts to buy the ability to extract fossil fuels from our communities with as little government oversight as possible, all while destroying our air, water, health, communities and our climate.

While the industry is working hard to protect its profits and drown out the worldwide demand for clean, renewable fuels, there is a tremendous movement afoot around the world to protect our global resources from fracking.

The first Global Frackdown in September 2012 brought together 200 community actions in over 20 countries to challenge fracking. The second Global Frackdown in October 2013, was even bigger with over 250 actions in 30 countries spanning six continents. And we continue to grow.

Together as a movement, we have:

  • Passed more than 400 measures against fracking, wastewater injection and frac sand mining in communities across the United States.
  • Kept fracking out of the Delaware River Basin.
  • Passed ballot measures banning or placing a moratorium on fracking in Longmont, Boulder, Fort Collins, Broomfield, and Lafayette Colorado, and in Oberlin and Broadview Heights, Ohio.
  • Passed an indefinite moratorium on fracking in Vermont.
  • Continued to keep New York and Maryland frack free.
  • Launched Americans Against Fracking – a national coalition to ban fracking – and strong statewide coalitions in New York, California, Colorado, Oregon, Ohio, and Maryland.
  • Upheld bans on fracking in Bulgaria and France, despite intensive pressure from industry.
  • Pushed for moratoria in multiple regions in Europe.
  • Delayed Chevron’s plans to drill for shale gas in eastern Romania and won recognition in court that local authorities have the right to ban fracking.
  • Maintained a moratorium on fracking in the Netherlands until 2015.
  • Further delayed shale gas exploration by requiring the federal and regional governments to engage in a comprehensive risk assessment, de facto sustaining a moratorium on fracking in Germany.
  • Pressured the Czech Environment Minister to reject an application for shale gas exploration/
  • Persuaded five regions in Spain to adopt regional bans on fracking (Navarra, Cantabria, La Rioja, Andalucía & Cataluña).
  • Convinced the Leitrim County Council in Ireland to ban fracking.
  • Blocked several shale gas drilling sites in the UK.
  • Organized to oppose fracking in communities in Argentina, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco and Egypt.
  • Passed more than 30 local bans on fracking in Argentina.
  • Introduced a bill to ban fracking in Mexico.
  • Spurred the introduction of new laws for assessing unconventional gas impacts in Australia.
  • Delayed fracking in South Africa.
  • Won recognition in the European Parliament for the right of local communities to be consulted about fracking in their area.

The latest Global Frackdown united concerned residents everywhere for a day of action on October 11, 2014 to send a message to elected officials across the globe that we want a future powered by clean, renewable energy — not dirty, polluting fossil fuels. The journey to a renewable energy future will not be fueled by aggressively expanding the use of extreme technologies to extract oil and gas. Climate scientists warn that continued extraction and burning of fossil fuels will lead to catastrophic climate change.

Participants in the Global Frackdown will organize events in their communities to challenge decision makers to oppose fracking, united around a common mission statement calling for a ban on fracking and investment in a clean energy future.